Show Notes: Episode 15 & 16, Route 66

For these two episodes, writer and poet Nora Hickey joins us to discuss the impact of America’s most famous road, Route 66, on Albuquerque. She interviews David Dunaway, author of The Route 66 Companion, and discusses her own experiences with the Mother Road.

 

We also talk about some of Albuquerque's more famous Route 66 sites.

 

The KiMo Theatre

Built in 1927, the same year that Route 66 was commissioned, the KiMo theatre is a unique example of the Pueblo Deco architectural style.

 

 

Some visitors may be shocked by the swastikas prominently displayed in the theater's interior, but they have nothing to do with Nazi Germany. Instead, they are "whirling log" designs, used by various Native American groups.

 

Sign from the El Vado Motel

Sign from the El Vado Motel

De Anza Motor Lodge

De Anza Motor Lodge

We check out the history of two of Albuquerque's most iconic 66 motels: the El Vado, built in 1937 and the De Anza, built in 1939. Both are currently owned by the city and soon to undergo renovation and revitalization.

 

The De Anza is home to a beautiful Native mural depicting the Shalako dance at Zuni Pueblo.

The De Anza is home to a beautiful Native mural depicting the Shalako dance at Zuni Pueblo.

Mike tells the sad story of the Oasis gas station, a site in Tijeras canyon beset by tragedy.

Other things discussed:

The Negro Motorists Green Book (And check out the interactive map here!)

Albuquerque Rapid Transit. Will it kill 66? Or save it?